Blog Posts for National Arts Marketing Project Conference

Thank you to the many people who have been blog contributors to, and readers of ArtsBlog over the years. ArtsBlog has long been a space where we uplifted stories from the field that demonstrated how the arts strengthen our communities socially, educationally, and economically; where trends and issues and controversies were called out; and advocacy tools were provided to help you make the case for more arts funding and favorable arts policies.

As part of Americans for the Arts’ recent Strategic Realignment Process, we were asked to evaluate our storytelling communications platforms and evolve the way we share content. As a result, we launched the Designing Our Destiny portal to explore new ways of telling stories and sharing information, one that is consistent with our longtime practice of, “No numbers without a story, and no stories without a number.”

As we put our energy into developing this platform and reevaluate our communications strategies, we have put ArtsBlog on hold. That is, you can read past blog posts, but we are not posting new ones. You can look to the Designing Our Destiny portal and our news items feed on the Americans for the Arts website for stories you would have seen in ArtsBlog in the past.

ArtsBlog will remain online through this year as we determine the best way to archive this valuable resource and the knowledge you’ve shared here.

As ever, we are grateful for your participation in ArtsBlog and thank you for your work in advancing the arts. It is important, and you are important for doing it.


Mr. Ceylon Narvelle Mitchell

NAMPC Newbie Takeaways

Posted by Mr. Ceylon Narvelle Mitchell, Dec 11, 2019 0 comments


Mr. Ceylon Narvelle Mitchell

The 2019 National Arts Marketing Project Conference in Miami, FL was my first arts administration conference and I had a wonderful time! As an individual artist cultivating diverse audiences as well as an entrepreneur serving clients across the arts ecosystem, #NAMPC was the most ideal professional development for both my artistic and administrative growth. 

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Ms. Katryn Geane

The Power of Conflict: Why You Should Welcome Tough Conversations

Posted by Ms. Katryn Geane, Oct 18, 2019 0 comments


Ms. Katryn Geane

Earlier this year, we gathered marketing leaders from top cultural institutions in New York City to talk about conflict. It comes as no surprise that on the way to delivering on the mission, there can be disagreements, clashes, and maybe all-out battles. We set out to create a brave space to have this conversation and brought in an expert to show us the way.

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Mr. Kirk Bentley

Make Your Emails Accessible for Everyone

Posted by Mr. Kirk Bentley, Oct 18, 2019 0 comments


Mr. Kirk Bentley

As arts marketers, we’re always working to deliver the best experiences. Creating the perfect message and reaching out to interested followers at just the right time is our mission. But you could be missing out on connecting with a large segment of your fans by not optimizing your emails for accessibility.

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Ms. Beth Prevor

Share the responsibility—won’t you be my ally?

Posted by Ms. Beth Prevor, Oct 18, 2019 0 comments


Ms. Beth Prevor

As a hearing person in the Deaf world, I can’t begin to understand and represent that experience, but what I can do is advocate, assist, help, and be an ally. In the world of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion, as a disabled person, I can understand and represent that experience as well as be an ally.

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Meghan K Randolph

Looking to the Future, Wherever You Are

Posted by Meghan K Randolph, Oct 17, 2019 0 comments


Meghan K Randolph

Many of us in the arts administration world have experienced ticket sales panic when it comes to new or unusual works. How do we get people to take a chance on something they’ve never heard of, when we’re literally scientifically conditioned to resist change?

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Amanda Faraone

Telling the Bigger Story: Arts Communications Beyond Your Constituents

Posted by Amanda Faraone, Oct 17, 2019 0 comments


Amanda Faraone

So often, as marketers and communicators, we are focused on the immediate future of our organization and can’t get the perspective we need to see the bigger story that we are not telling, the one that informs every aspect of the arts ecosystem: how the broader public views the arts.

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