#365take2 — or, A letter without expectation.

Posted by Erin J. Hoppe, Sep 21, 2018 0 comments

There is so much to write in a blog about female leadership in the nonprofit arts world. I’ve been incredibly lucky in my professional and personal life. My experiences in adversity are real, but they are also privileged. I’m white, come from a wonderfully loving home, and am able-bodied. I have generally been surrounded by supportive people—women—family, friends, coworkers. I don’t have a lot of stories about being held back or feeling discrimination, but that doesn’t mean I don’t have them. The Nonprofit Leadership Workbook for Women notes that while 73% of all nonprofit employees are women, we only account for 45% of nonprofit CEOs. Slightly better than the 5% of female CEOs in the Fortune 500. I was honored to become the executive director of my organization very early in career, well before I was ready. But that’s the thing about women, right? We face challenges head on. We take advantage of opportunities when they arise. We figure it all out as we go. We must. We’re spending our days making the world a better place.

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Beyond Autism Awareness Month, from a Teen’s Perspective

Posted by Glen Sheppard, Sep 19, 2018 0 comments

The High Museum of Art in Atlanta is working on developing inclusive programs that will support visitors on the autism spectrum all year long. In 2016, the museum began partnering with Tapestry Public Charter School to pilot inclusive programming for students on the autism spectrum. Through this program, the museum works closely with educators at Tapestry to create curriculum-based, student-relevant guided tours and interactive workshops. They receive invaluable feedback from both teachers and students. One such student is Glen Sheppard, a ninth-grader at Tapestry who has participated in the program for the past two years. Glen wrote about his experiences at the High, and we’re thrilled to share his thoughts with you on ARTSblog.

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On Becoming an Effective Leader and Creating Your Own Opportunities

Posted by Marianne R. LaCrosse, Sep 18, 2018 0 comments

As a woman working in the arts management field, I know how critical it is to look for opportunities and to take advantage of them. I have had several women role models who have demonstrated the importance of being a good leader, and now that I’m at a stage in my career where I am training the next generation of arts leaders, I’ve been reflecting on what it means to be a woman in a leadership position, and how to create your own opportunities. There are three guiding principles that I continually share with my interns who are just getting a glimpse into the inner workings of an arts organization. First, always be curious about what you are doing and what others are doing around you. Second, don’t sweat the small stuff; work your way through problems the best way you know how and don’t lose sight of the bigger picture. And finally, pass your knowledge and expertise on to the next generation.

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Breaking Down the South Dakota v. Wayfair Decision and Its Impact on the Arts and Small Business

Posted by Ms. Kate O. McClanahan, Sep 17, 2018 0 comments

On June 21, 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its opinion in the case South Dakota v. Wayfair. In essence, the Court ruled that state and local governments can require retailers with no physical presence in the state to collect sales tax on those sales. The Court ruled that the standard for determining the constitutionality of a state tax law is whether the tax applies to an activity that has “substantial nexus” with the taxing state; i.e., the Court threw out a previous requirement for “physical presence.” Previously, if the vendor didn’t have physical presence in the state where the buyer was, there was no requirement on the business to collect the tax.. Now, practically, how does a seller know in which state to collect tax? Is it where the seller is shipping it? Is it the billing address? And what does this mean for artists and art sellers?

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Experiential Education for the Future of Arts Leadership

Posted by Emma Osore, Sep 14, 2018 0 comments

Often, the pathways to job positions at the highest levels in the arts field are not very clear. The Diversity in Arts Leadership internship (DIAL) helps ensure undergraduates interested in leadership at arts organizations gain the skills, networks, and experience needed to assume leadership roles in the arts. Each intern in the Americans for the Arts’ DIAL Internship has displayed a combination of passion for the arts, some experience leading meaningful projects, and self-identifies as being from a background traditionally untapped for arts leadership. The DIAL internship then provides the platform for competitively selected undergraduates to explore nonprofit careers in the arts, taking the arts practices they love and combining them with meaningful experiences in business and leadership. While most internships can be considered experiential, the DIAL internship is a ten-week experience.

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