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Separate but Equal

Programming should be unique in the context of individual markets. Across the country, most orchestras approach programming from the same perspective. They feel trapped in a Faustian programming bargain. They know change is needed to attract a new audience and new donors, but at the same time they worry that accepting change will alienate traditional donors.

Yes
Source Name: 
Thought on the Symphony
Author Name: 
Peter Sachon

Goodbye E-Mail Chains: A New Collaboration Platform for Marketers

If too many cooks are spoiling your broth, maybe what you really need is a better kitchen. That’s the idea behind collaboration platform GraphEffect. A sort of social network for the marketing community, GraphEffect provides a virtual space where agencies, brands, vendors, and media buyers can work together to create social marketing campaigns.

Yes
Source Name: 
Fast Company Create
Author Name: 
Douglas Quenqua

Three Ways You’re Wrong about What Your Customers Want

Most marketers think that the best way to hold onto customers is through “engagement” — interacting as much as possible with them and building relationships. It turns out that that’s rarely true. In a study involving more than 7,000 consumers, we found that companies often have dangerously wrong ideas about how best to engage with customers. Consider these three myths.

Yes
Source Name: 
BRW
Author Name: 
Karen Freeman, Patrick Spenner and Anna Bird

Is Your Organization Prepared? Get ArtsReady with Americans for the Arts Membership

Posted by Roger Vacovsky, Sep 18, 2012 0 comments

Did you know that September is National Preparedness Month? It seems like a strange time of the year to promote emergency preparedness, especially for Atlantic Coast dwellers such as myself. This is one of the most active periods of the year for hurricanes, and I would like to think that any individual or organization would already have a plan in place should they encounter such a natural disaster.

Well, I don’t. I haven’t figured out if the structure in which I live in is sturdy enough to withstand a heavy storm, I haven’t mapped out an evacuation route, I haven’t found a location in my neighborhood where I can seek shelter (I’m assuming it’s a local school, but I don’t even know where that is nearby where I live). I don’t have any of my files stored up in a cloud where I could retrieve them should I lose my hard drive. I’m not prepared.

You think I would have learned better. In September 2005, I was living in Houston when Hurricane Rita hit, and that was right after Katrina devastated New Orleans. Luckily, back then I did have a plan. The fourth largest city in the United States was trying to evacuate and jammed all major thoroughfares to the point where folks ran out of gas trying to get out of the area. My roommate and I mapped out a network of side streets that took us all the way out of the city to his father’s place north of the beltway and out of harm’s way.

So, having escaped that hardship unscathed, you would think I always have a preparedness plan in place, no matter where I live. The truth is, always being prepared for a seemingly rare disaster is a hard thing to keep up with. I’m willing to bet that many of us don’t afford the time to back our work up on a second hard drive, or store extra cans of food and water in case of a power outage, or know where our evacuation location is.

I think it is ingenious that South Arts developed an emergency preparedness tool called ArtsReady for arts organizations. The ArtsReady toolkit tells you what you need in place to have a solid emergency plan. They have the ability to store your files in their cloud for you, they give you all of the information of emergency contacts for you and have even developed a network of participating organizations that you can go to for help should you encounter an unfortunate situation.

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NAMPRadio Episode 19: Community Theater's Low-cost Marketing Innovations

Ron talks with Lisa Mallette, Executive Artistic Director of City Lights Theater Company about their committement “to create an 'aha!' aspect for each production" and the use of innovative techniques such as using specialized cards that went along with popular play “In The Next Room (The Vibrator Play).”  View the current season at the City Lights Theater Company on their website: http://cltc.org.

Audio File: 
Preview Image: 
Author Emails: 
ron@groupofminds.com, lisa@cltc.org

Is Instagram Useful for Nonprofit Marketing?

Instagram, the mobile photography app purchased by Facebook, has been getting a lot of attention lately. From critics saying it is killing photography to hype and hoopla from marketing pundits saying it is a must-have as part of your “visual marketing tool box.”

Yes
Source Name: 
Beth's Blog
Author Name: 
Beth Kanter

Four Easy Steps for Handling Complaints

No matter how impeccably your business is run, you're going to get complaints. Customers will call you, angered by a mistake you or a member of your team made. And employees will air grievances, feeling management has been unfair to them. How you handle these situations can make or break your company. When the inevitable complaints come, it's natural to get defensive and explain why the person's complaint isn't legitimate--but that never gets you anywhere.

Yes
Source Name: 
inc.com
Author Name: 
John Treace

Klout, Schmout. Connecting Is the Real Clout

Let me start by saying, I’m not against numbers, scores, or analytical methods that give us an objective understanding of how far-reaching our brand’s impact is, be it our personal or professional brand.

Yes
Source Name: 
Social Media Today
Author Name: 
Bryan Kramer

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