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29 ITEMS FOUND

Museums Are The Biggest Job Creator You’ve Never Heard Of

OK museums, it’s time to talk money.
Friday, March 17, 2017
I don’t mean admission fees or fundraising drives. I’m talking about all the money museums generate for local, national, and global economies. If you haven’t yet found a resolution for 2017, make it to spread the word that museums are important for the economy.
 
Yes
NAMP Resource Categories: 
Source Name: 
Museum Hack
Author Name: 
Ashleigh Hibbins

Announcing the Launch of the new National Arts Marketing Project Website!

Posted by Laura Kakolewski, Jan 25, 2017 0 comments

We listened to your needs and built a website that is simple to navigate, while providing the educational tools you need to market the arts in today’s competitive landscape.

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Marketing the Arts: Lessons from a Community Marketing Collaboration

The Charlotte MSO today is led by a senior marketing executive with a full-time staff of 10 plus one part-time employee and a commissioned sales representative. The mission of the MSO is to improve the overall quality of marketing, increase revenues and build audiences for each of the four participating organizations — Opera Carolina, Charlotte Repertory Theatre, North Carolina Dance Theatre (NCDT) and the North Carolina Blumenthal Performing Arts Center.

A specific objective of the Knight-supported project has been making market research and audience analysis an ongoing part of marketing campaigns. Another is improving marketing effectiveness through integrated mailing lists, improved graphic design and increased use of in-kind marketing support. A third is increasing the array of marketing services available to each organization. Whenever possible, the MSO attempts to leverage outside resources and reduce expenses from advertising media and other vendors by taking advantage of economies of scale.

The AMS research showed that the MSO has had a positive impact on earned revenue for the participating arts groups. Ticket revenues grew for three of the four groups, and the fourth company is now gaining subscribers after a period of decline. Other measures, such as audience awareness and percentage of seats sold, show more mixed results.

Implementing the MSO has not been an easy task for the participating groups. Making the transition from individual marketing programs to a cooperative approach has required effort, flexibility and a high level of trust in relationships that continue to evolve. In both concept and implementation, the MSO has required reinforcement along the way. But the very existence of the MSO, now well beyond the experimental phase, demonstrates the groups’ continued commitment.

The MSO has improved the quality of marketing for its member arts organizations and has fostered collaboration among the groups. The marketing team has created new sources of revenue, such as the outside clients and a successful Playbill publishing operation. The member groups continue to work together in ways they never had done before and almost certainly would not be doing today without the MSO. For the members, the benefits of the MSO collaboration continue to outweigh any real or perceived difficulties of the partnership. [Executive Summary p. 4]

"The Charlotte MSO today is led by a senior marketing executive with a full-time staff of 10 plus one part-time employee and a commissioned sales representative. The mission of the MSO is to improve the overall quality of marketing, increase revenues and build audiences for each of the four participating organizations — Opera Carolina, Charlotte Repertory Theatre, North Carolina Dance Theatre (NCDT) and the North Carolina Blumenthal Performing Arts Center." [Executive Summary p. 4]

Report
Shapiro, Phyllis, Editor
48
Publisher Reference: 
John S. and John L. Knight Foundation
Research Abstract
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
November 1999
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Everyones Internet Art Car Weekend Orange Show Center for Visionary Art Sponsorship Case Study

Everyones Internet (Ev1. Net) Art Car Weekend is an annual public art festival in Houston, Texas that celebrates the drive to create. It draws more than 1,400 participating artists from around the U.S., Canada and Mexico and a live audience of more than 150,000 for a parade and related events. Now 18 years old, this event has inspired other art car events throughout the US, but Houston's Art Car Weekend is a signature event, the biggest and best. This case study discusses the need and process of gaining sponsorships for the program.

Everyones Internet (Ev1. Net) Art Car Weekend is an annual public art festival in Houston, Texas that celebrates the drive to create. It draws more than 1,400 participating artists from around the U.S., Canada and Mexico and a live audience of more than 150,000 for a parade and related events. Now 18 years old, this event has inspired other art car events throughout the US, but Houston's Art Car Weekend is a signature event, the biggest and best. This case study discusses the need and process of gaining sponsorships for the program.

Case Study
Theis, Suanne and Stoilis, Kim
4
Publisher Reference: 
Americans for the Arts (ArtsMarketing.org)
Research Abstract
Is this an Americans for the Arts Publications: 
Yes
2004
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NAMP Resource Categories: 

Infographic: Crowdfunding Success Statistics & How You Should Raise Money Online

With numbers and visuals from GoGetFunding, we learn tips for a successful crowdfunding campaign, including social media and marketing tactics, as well as strategies for how to use donor trends and tendencies to your advantage. GoGetFunding tells us that teams almost always raise more than individuals, that the most effective campaign timeline is only between 20 and 40 days, and claims that campaigns with a video raise over 100% more funds than those without one.

GoGetFunding shares strategies for a successful crowdfunding campaign in their 2013 Crowdfunding Success Statistics infographic.

Infographic
GoGetFunding
1
Publisher Details: 
GoGetFunding
One Pagers
Is this an Americans for the Arts Publications: 
No
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
December 13, 2016
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NAMP Resource Categories: 

Funding The Arts With Creative Partners

Posted by Ms. Rebekah L. Lengel, Sep 10, 2015 0 comments

Across the country, arts organizations are constantly seeking ways to do more with less and fundraise creatively and collaboratively. For artist led organizations, this need is only amplified by lack available funds that can be dedicated to operational support, and the need to create an artistic product.

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Monograph: Cultural Tourism: Bridging America Through Partnerships in Arts, Tourism and Economic Development

<P>Visitors come from around the world to New Orleans when they may know only one thing about the city - jazz. New York means Broadway. Santa Fe, N.M. equates with visual arts. When cities are able to define themselves so succinctly, they understand that their culture is truly what they have to sell. Herein lies the opportunistic marriage of culture and tourism. And like all partnerships, the relationship must include mutual respect, commitment and trust. Like a business partnership, it also requires entrepreneurial capabilities.</P>
<P>For the arts, cultural tourism can provide an opportunity for greater earned income. Cultural tourism programs are the catalyst for new audiences and dollars, helping artists and arts organizations to grow stronger in these days of declining federal grants and increased competition for dollars at foundation and corporate levels. For tourism, arts and culture are the expressions of a community's heart and soul. Together they form an image that sets the city apart and creates anticipation and excitement for the traveler. This is the raison d'etre why a convention group may select one city over another; why international travelers with limited time but so much to see, books your city as one of only a few on their tours.</P>
<P>Culture and tourism make strange bedfellows, at least at first. Tourism people talk numbers like room nights, occupancy rates and parking for buses. Arts people talk creative programming and event planning. But everyone knows that any successful enterprise is built on both. To build a long-lasting relationship, culture and tourism must join hands in collaboration, implementation and communication. (p. 1-2)</P>
<P>Americans for the Arts’ Monograph series featured in-depth issue papers on topics that were of the greatest interest to our members and arts professionals at the time. They often still serve as excellent resources for best practices and historic reference for today’s issues. Monographs were produced from 1993–2010. Monographs from 2001-2010 are available for downloadable in PDF format our online store at a nominal fee for nonmembers but free to members. All monographs from 1993-2000 are available for free download via the National Arts Administration and Policy Publications Database.<P>

To build a long-lasting relationship, culture and tourism must join hands in collaboration, implementation and communication.

Approved
P
NA
RS
Jenny Chowning
Report
Glickman, Louise
Americans for the Arts Monograph
Volume 1, Number 1
12
Tuesday, December 31, 1996
File Title: 
Cultural Tourism: Bridging America Through Partnerships in Arts, Tourism and Economic Development
Publisher Reference: 
Americans for the Arts
Old URL: 
http://www.artsusa.org/NAPD/modules/resourceManager/publicsearch.aspx?id=7995
Resource File ID: 
275
Research Abstract
Rank: 
6
Is this an Americans for the Arts Publications: 
Yes
Is CAC: 
No
Description: 
January 1997 Monograph
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
Global Tag: 
January 1997
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Entrepreneurship and Leadership in Marketing the Arts

<P>It is around the particularities of cultural marketing that entrepreneurship and leadership in marketing the arts must be articulated. The marketing process in the arts starts with the creative work; the manager cannot modify this core product. Thus the marketing process in the arts is conceptually different from that in other fields. At the same time, because the cultural sector features a very fragmented and competitive market, comprising different categories of consumer, the potential client is faced with an overwhelming number and diversity of choices. If the market is to be extended beyond its current limits, firms in the high art sector will have to increase their knowledge of the who and why of consumer behaviour. They will also have to engage in stronger branding and positioning efforts and make better use of information technology for marketing purposes. (Publisher's abstract)</P>

It is around the particularities of cultural marketing that entrepreneurship and leadership in marketing the arts must be articulated. The marketing process in the arts starts with the creative work; the manager cannot modify this core product. Thus the marketing process in the arts is conceptually different from that in other fields.

Approved
P
NA
Research
Periodical (article)
Colbert, Francois
International Journal of Arts Management
Volume 6, Number 1
p. 30-39
Publisher Reference: 
HEC Montreal
Old URL: 
http://www.artsusa.org/NAPD/modules/resourceManager/publicsearch.aspx?id=10493
Research Abstract
Rank: 
0
Is this an Americans for the Arts Publications: 
No
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
Fall 2003
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NAMP Resource Categories: 

Marketing and LAAs: Reaching Your Community's Untapped Audience

<P>Steady trends in arts funding and consumer marketing point to a growing need for arts organizations, large and small, to make increasing earned income a top priority. As private philanthropy shifts its focus to education and social services, government funding dwindles, and the consumer marketplace is increasingly crowded with entertainment options and high-tech innovations, it is more crucial than ever for cultural organizations to be competitive by understanding state-of-the-art consumer marketing methods.</P>
<P>Without a specific product to market, such as a season of performing arts events, a gallery exhibit, or arts festival, some local arts agencies may view marketing as the exclusive domain of presenting and producing organizations, and limit their involvement to the occasional technical assistance workshop or, in some cases, a cooperative advertising program. It is the intent of this issue of Monographs to explore a variety of ways in which local arts agencies can provide a valuable service to their communities and arts organization constituents by becoming more active in the sometimes overwhelming world of marketing.</P>

It is the intent of this issue of Monographs to explore a variety of ways in which local arts agencies can provide a valuable service to their communities and arts organization constituents by becoming more active in the sometimes overwhelming world of marketing.

Approved
P
NA
RS
Jenny Chowning
As of October 1, 1997, the National Assembly of Local Arts Agencies is Americans for the Arts. Edited by Jennifer Neiman.
Periodical (article)
Greenberg, Arthur
Americans for the Arts Monograph
Volume 4, Number 6
16 p.
Friday, June 30, 1995
File Title: 
Marketing and LAAs: Reaching Your Community's Untapped Audience
Publisher Reference: 
Americans for the Arts
Old URL: 
http://www.artsusa.org/NAPD/modules/resourceManager/publicsearch.aspx?id=8519
Resource File ID: 
298
Research Abstract
Rank: 
8
Is this an Americans for the Arts Publications: 
Yes
Description: 
July 1995 Monograph
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
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Monograph: United Arts Funds: Meeting the Challenge of Increased Private Sector Support for the Arts

<p>United arts funds are nonprofit organizations that manage an annual combined or federated appeal designed to raise money on behalf of three or more arts institutions in a community. This monograph clearly defines the characteristics and benefits of UAF and provides analysis of the success rates of recent UAF campaigns. A great introduction to the workings of UAF, and a valuable resource to communities struggling to increase private sector support for the arts.</p>

<P>Americans for the Arts’ Monograph series featured in-depth issue papers on topics that were of the greatest interest to our members and arts professionals at the time. They often still serve as excellent resources for best practices and historic reference for today’s issues. Monographs were produced from 1993–2010. Monographs from 2001-2010 are available for downloadable in PDF format our online store at a nominal fee for nonmembers but free to members. All monographs from 1993-2000 are available for free download via the National Arts Administration and Policy Publications Database.<P>

In communities of all sizes, United Arts Ffunds (UAF) are working to broaden the base of support for the arts, promote excellence in the arts and arts management, and to ensure that arts organizations are financially stable.

Approved
P
NA
RS
Jenny Chowning
Report
Bush, Robert
Americans for the Arts Monograph
12
Sunday, November 30, 2003
Publisher Reference: 
Americans for the Arts
Old URL: 
http://www.artsusa.org/NAPD/modules/resourceManager/publicsearch.aspx?id=9020
Resource File ID: 
209
Research Abstract
Rank: 
3
Is this an Americans for the Arts Publications: 
Yes
Is CAC: 
No
Description: 
December 2003 Monograph
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
Global Tag: 
December 2003
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