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The 11 Generation Z Statistics Advertisers Must Know

The Top 11 Generation Z Statistics For Every CMO
Friday, March 17, 2017
Born in the time between the early 1990’s and the mid-2000s, Generation Z occupies a nebulous age bracket. Even so, the individuals that make up Generation Z have many characteristics that make them easily distinguishable from the preceding generations. Most significant, though, is Gen Z'ers affinity for the Internet. As “digital natives”, Generation Z presents a unique challenge and lucrative opportunity for digital marketers.
We’ve collected the major Generation Z statistics to give marketers a better picture of this developing consumer demographic.
 
Yes
Source Name: 
Mediakix
Author Name: 
Evan

One Ring to Convert Them All: Using Topical Events to Turn New Prospects into Single Ticket Buyers

Getting the right message to the right people at the right time. But what does that actually look like in practice?
Wednesday, March 15, 2017

When you’re thinking about social content, think about the 70/30 rule of engagement. 70% of your content should be giving users interesting, fun, and shareable content. Do that correctly and you've earned the right to give users 30% sales content. One way to create good 70% content is to tap into what's going on in the world outside of your organization. This is called a social “sweet spot.”

Yes
Source Name: 
Capacity Interactive
Author Name: 
Sam Kindler

The Latino Experience in Museums: An Exploratory Audience Research Study

The fast growth of the Latino population in the Unit - ed States is a well-known fact, but most museums ac - knowledge that this growth is not reflected among their audiences. According to the National Endowment for the Arts’s Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA, the nation’s largest population survey of arts par - ticipation trends), cultural participation among Latinos is slowly growing. For example, the 2013 SPPA report shows that 14.5% of adults who visited an art museum identify as Latinos—an increase of just 0.2% from the 2008 report. Even though there are many general de - mographic studies about the participation of Latinos and other minority groups in museums and the arts (SPPA/NEA, 2013; Farrell, B. & Medvedeva, M., 2010; In- stitute of Museum and Library Services, 2008), there are few studies that focus specifically on the perceptions, motivations, and values of this population associated with museums and other cultural institutions (Betan- court, 2012; MPAC, 2008). Contemporanea’s primary motivation in conducting this study is to contribute to the field of museums and cultural institutions by deep - ening the discussion of audience diversification.

An in-depth understanding of the Latino experience in museums can help provide institutions with the foun- dation for strategic planning that supports long-term sustainability. This exploratory research study attempts to understand the drivers of engagement and the un- derlying factors that permeate the experience of Lati- nos at museums—any type of museum—with the goal of helping organizations to design experiences that are engaging and relevant for this important growing pop - ulation 1 . While there are important distinctions among the different types of museums that need to be consid- ered, our analysis focuses on commonalities and shared insights. Additional research and analysis may be useful in building on this research and highlighting those dif- ferences. Furthermore, while this study focuses on mu- seums, its implications are broader in reach and likely relevant for the cultural participation field in general. [Introduction, p. 1]

The fast growth of the Latino population in the United States is a well-known fact, but most museums acknowledge that this growth is not reflected among their audiences. An in-depth understanding of the Latino experience in museums can help provide institutions with the foundation for strategic planning that supports long-term sustainability. This exploratory research study attempts to understand the drivers of engagement and the underlying factors that permeate the experience of Latinos at museums—any type of museum—with the goal of helping organizations to design experiences that are engaging and relevant for this important growing population.

Report
Acevedo, Salvador and Madara, Monique
11
File Title: 
The Latino Experience in Museums: An Exploratory Audience Research Study
Publisher Reference: 
Contemporanea
Research Abstract
Is this an Americans for the Arts Publications: 
No
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
April 2015
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NAMP Resource Categories: 

Announcing the Launch of the new National Arts Marketing Project Website!

Posted by Laura Kakolewski, Jan 25, 2017 0 comments

We listened to your needs and built a website that is simple to navigate, while providing the educational tools you need to market the arts in today’s competitive landscape.

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Marketing the Arts: Lessons from a Community Marketing Collaboration

The Charlotte MSO today is led by a senior marketing executive with a full-time staff of 10 plus one part-time employee and a commissioned sales representative. The mission of the MSO is to improve the overall quality of marketing, increase revenues and build audiences for each of the four participating organizations — Opera Carolina, Charlotte Repertory Theatre, North Carolina Dance Theatre (NCDT) and the North Carolina Blumenthal Performing Arts Center.

A specific objective of the Knight-supported project has been making market research and audience analysis an ongoing part of marketing campaigns. Another is improving marketing effectiveness through integrated mailing lists, improved graphic design and increased use of in-kind marketing support. A third is increasing the array of marketing services available to each organization. Whenever possible, the MSO attempts to leverage outside resources and reduce expenses from advertising media and other vendors by taking advantage of economies of scale.

The AMS research showed that the MSO has had a positive impact on earned revenue for the participating arts groups. Ticket revenues grew for three of the four groups, and the fourth company is now gaining subscribers after a period of decline. Other measures, such as audience awareness and percentage of seats sold, show more mixed results.

Implementing the MSO has not been an easy task for the participating groups. Making the transition from individual marketing programs to a cooperative approach has required effort, flexibility and a high level of trust in relationships that continue to evolve. In both concept and implementation, the MSO has required reinforcement along the way. But the very existence of the MSO, now well beyond the experimental phase, demonstrates the groups’ continued commitment.

The MSO has improved the quality of marketing for its member arts organizations and has fostered collaboration among the groups. The marketing team has created new sources of revenue, such as the outside clients and a successful Playbill publishing operation. The member groups continue to work together in ways they never had done before and almost certainly would not be doing today without the MSO. For the members, the benefits of the MSO collaboration continue to outweigh any real or perceived difficulties of the partnership. [Executive Summary p. 4]

"The Charlotte MSO today is led by a senior marketing executive with a full-time staff of 10 plus one part-time employee and a commissioned sales representative. The mission of the MSO is to improve the overall quality of marketing, increase revenues and build audiences for each of the four participating organizations — Opera Carolina, Charlotte Repertory Theatre, North Carolina Dance Theatre (NCDT) and the North Carolina Blumenthal Performing Arts Center." [Executive Summary p. 4]

Report
Shapiro, Phyllis, Editor
48
Publisher Reference: 
John S. and John L. Knight Foundation
Research Abstract
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
November 1999
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Outcome Management in the Arts

In 2005, The Altria Group, Inc. initiated the third in a three part series of programs testing the efficacy of an outcome management framework in its major grantmaking areas. This third area, and the subject of this case study, is the arts, specifically contemporary dance, and an area which has been a hallmark of Altria’s corporate giving.

Altria’s intention for the three related outcome projects has been:

  1. To gain a better understanding of the beneficial impact of their investment on the lives of the people their funded projects serve.
  2. To assist their grantees in applying tools and techniques helpful in achieving their missions.
  3. To contribute to the broader field’s efforts to understand and improve on their accomplishments.

In all of its major program areas, Altria collaborates with national partners with strong reputations for program knowledge. For this project in contemporary dance, Altria selected the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies (NASAA), a nonprofit association that provides grant making and evaluation assistance to public arts funders across all discipline areas, and Mr. Sam Miller, President of Leveraging Investments in Creativity (LINC), and former Executive Director of the New England Foundation for the Arts and the National Dance Project.

The Rensselaerville Institute, a nonprofit group that specializes in outcome management for government and philanthropy, was the chief consultant, leading the design and implementation of the pilot project. DanceUSA, the national service organization for professional dance companies, was also an active project participant. By assembling this team, Altria brought a depth of expertise and a broad range of perspectives to the project, encouraging collaboration among partners who could foster long-term use of the results. [Background, p. 3]

In 2005, The Altria Group, Inc. initiated the third in a three part series of programs testing the efficacy of an outcome management framework in its major grantmaking areas. This third area, and the subject of this case study, is the arts, specifically contemporary dance, and an area which has been a hallmark of Altria’s corporate giving.

Case Study
Altria Group, Inc.
27
Publisher Reference: 
Americans for the Arts (ArtsMarketing.org)
Research Abstract
Is this an Americans for the Arts Publications: 
Yes
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
April 2006
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Take the Fear out of ROI

Between print advertising, direct mail, and social media marketing, it may feel overwhelming and time-consuming to stop and decipher which marketing efforts are working and which aren't. But in the long run, measuring your return on investment (ROI) for your marketing initiatives will show your arts organization which efforts are effective and profitable, and which efforts may just be a drain on your budget and time.

In this e-Book, Take the Fear out of ROI, you'll learn how to measure the ROI of a number of different marketing campaigns that you can apply to your own work. You'll:

  • Absorb just what Return on Investment means and why it is so advantageous to your everyday work.
  • Allow our friendly pig Stuart to guide you in measuring the ROI on his e-mail marketing campaign, a direct mail piece, social media marketing, and more!
  • Understand key points (we call them truisms) about return on investment that will dispel any lingering FEAR you may have!

In this e-Book, Take the Fear out of ROI, you'll learn how to measure the ROI of a number of different marketing campaigns that you can apply to your own work.

E-Book
Americans for the Arts
National Arts Marketing Project E-Book
28
Publisher Reference: 
Americans for the Arts (ArtsMarketing.org)
Research Abstract
Is this an Americans for the Arts Publications: 
Yes
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
2012
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NAMP Resource Categories: 

2014 National Arts Marketing Project Conference: Culture Track

Video

Culture Track 2014 – the largest national study on the attitudes and behaviors of U.S. cultural consumers. How are audiences redefining the role of cultural organizations? What are the primary influences and barriers that are driving and presenting audiences from participate in cultural activities?

Preview Image: 

The 15 Types of People You’ll Meet at a Conference

With so many benefits of attending and goals to focus on during a conference, choosing just one can be a tall order. And with INBOUND 2016 around the corner, you might be asking yourself: Should you network, and make connections with smart people? Or should you stick to learning, and diligently take notes during the breakout sessions?

Whatever it is that you're hoping to accomplish, we've carved out personas for the 15 types of conference-goers you're most likely to meet or embody. We've all met at least one, and understanding them can help you figure out your goals for attending.

Yes
Source Name: 
HubSpot
Author Name: 
Brittany Leaning

Calling all Adventurers! and Other Market Research findings

Posted by Ms. Anna Prushinskaya, Ms. Sara Billmann, May 16, 2016 0 comments

Univeristy Musical Society works to develop insights into how exemplary performing arts organizations can successfully expand their audiences and retain them over time.

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