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11 ITEMS FOUND

The Many Hats of the 21st Century Arts Marketer: There is a Solution

Posted by Norah G. Johnson, Mar 28, 2017 0 comments

Realizations about trends in our field like multiple hat syndrome helped inspire a new program to support, strengthen and advance arts marketing and audience engagement skills in Pennsylvania.

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Diversity + Inclusion = A Winning Strategy

Posted by Floyd Green III, Mar 09, 2017 0 comments

If we’re going to talk about diversity, we also have to talk about inclusion. Diversity acknowledges and celebrates the differences we all bring to the world. Inclusion is about picking up all of those differences and putting them to work together, and using them to drive designed and desired outcomes. Diversity and inclusion are critical at Aetna, particularly when we think about our consumers—they don’t all look and think the same way. Our employees must be diverse so that our strategies and services are diverse, leading to a practice of inclusion that allows our customers to receive the support that best suits them individually.

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Announcing the Launch of the new National Arts Marketing Project Website!

Posted by Laura Kakolewski, Jan 25, 2017 0 comments

We listened to your needs and built a website that is simple to navigate, while providing the educational tools you need to market the arts in today’s competitive landscape.

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Marketing the Arts: Lessons from a Community Marketing Collaboration

The Charlotte MSO today is led by a senior marketing executive with a full-time staff of 10 plus one part-time employee and a commissioned sales representative. The mission of the MSO is to improve the overall quality of marketing, increase revenues and build audiences for each of the four participating organizations — Opera Carolina, Charlotte Repertory Theatre, North Carolina Dance Theatre (NCDT) and the North Carolina Blumenthal Performing Arts Center.

A specific objective of the Knight-supported project has been making market research and audience analysis an ongoing part of marketing campaigns. Another is improving marketing effectiveness through integrated mailing lists, improved graphic design and increased use of in-kind marketing support. A third is increasing the array of marketing services available to each organization. Whenever possible, the MSO attempts to leverage outside resources and reduce expenses from advertising media and other vendors by taking advantage of economies of scale.

The AMS research showed that the MSO has had a positive impact on earned revenue for the participating arts groups. Ticket revenues grew for three of the four groups, and the fourth company is now gaining subscribers after a period of decline. Other measures, such as audience awareness and percentage of seats sold, show more mixed results.

Implementing the MSO has not been an easy task for the participating groups. Making the transition from individual marketing programs to a cooperative approach has required effort, flexibility and a high level of trust in relationships that continue to evolve. In both concept and implementation, the MSO has required reinforcement along the way. But the very existence of the MSO, now well beyond the experimental phase, demonstrates the groups’ continued commitment.

The MSO has improved the quality of marketing for its member arts organizations and has fostered collaboration among the groups. The marketing team has created new sources of revenue, such as the outside clients and a successful Playbill publishing operation. The member groups continue to work together in ways they never had done before and almost certainly would not be doing today without the MSO. For the members, the benefits of the MSO collaboration continue to outweigh any real or perceived difficulties of the partnership. [Executive Summary p. 4]

"The Charlotte MSO today is led by a senior marketing executive with a full-time staff of 10 plus one part-time employee and a commissioned sales representative. The mission of the MSO is to improve the overall quality of marketing, increase revenues and build audiences for each of the four participating organizations — Opera Carolina, Charlotte Repertory Theatre, North Carolina Dance Theatre (NCDT) and the North Carolina Blumenthal Performing Arts Center." [Executive Summary p. 4]

Report
Shapiro, Phyllis, Editor
48
Publisher Reference: 
John S. and John L. Knight Foundation
Research Abstract
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
November 1999
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pARTnership Movement Tool-Kit: Using the pARTnership Movement Ad Campaign

The pARTnership Movement is a campaign from Americans for the Arts designed to reach business leaders with the message that the arts can build their competitive advantage. Did you know that, among other resources, the pARTnership Movement has a ready-made, free advertising campaign that you can download and easily use to promote arts and business in your community? Check out the latest pARTnership Movement tool-kit on the ads, chock full of what to expect when you download them, how to partner with the business community promote them, ways to inexpensively use them in your community, and examples of how other organizations around the country have effectively used the ads.

The pARTnership Movement is a campaign from Americans for the Arts designed to reach business leaders with the message that the arts can build their competitive advantage. Did you know that, among other resources, the pARTnership Movement has a ready-made, free advertising campaign that you can download and easily use to promote arts and business in your community? Check out the latest pARTnership Movement tool-kit on the ads, chock full of what to expect when you download them, how to partner with the business community promote them, ways to inexpensively use them in your community, and examples of how other organizations around the country have effectively used the ads.

Toolkit
Shue, Jordan
11
Publisher Reference: 
Americans for the Arts
Research Abstract
Is this an Americans for the Arts Publications: 
Yes
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
January 2016
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When the Arts and Tourism Join Forces: Arts Council Napa Valley

Posted by Laura Kakolewski, Sep 10, 2015 0 comments

Each year, in partnership with the Destination Marketing Association International (DMAI), Americans for the Arts honors the synergistic relationship and outstanding cooperative efforts between a Local Arts Agency and its Destination Marketing Organization in two communities across America.

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Monograph: Cultural Tourism: Bridging America Through Partnerships in Arts, Tourism and Economic Development

<P>Visitors come from around the world to New Orleans when they may know only one thing about the city - jazz. New York means Broadway. Santa Fe, N.M. equates with visual arts. When cities are able to define themselves so succinctly, they understand that their culture is truly what they have to sell. Herein lies the opportunistic marriage of culture and tourism. And like all partnerships, the relationship must include mutual respect, commitment and trust. Like a business partnership, it also requires entrepreneurial capabilities.</P>
<P>For the arts, cultural tourism can provide an opportunity for greater earned income. Cultural tourism programs are the catalyst for new audiences and dollars, helping artists and arts organizations to grow stronger in these days of declining federal grants and increased competition for dollars at foundation and corporate levels. For tourism, arts and culture are the expressions of a community's heart and soul. Together they form an image that sets the city apart and creates anticipation and excitement for the traveler. This is the raison d'etre why a convention group may select one city over another; why international travelers with limited time but so much to see, books your city as one of only a few on their tours.</P>
<P>Culture and tourism make strange bedfellows, at least at first. Tourism people talk numbers like room nights, occupancy rates and parking for buses. Arts people talk creative programming and event planning. But everyone knows that any successful enterprise is built on both. To build a long-lasting relationship, culture and tourism must join hands in collaboration, implementation and communication. (p. 1-2)</P>
<P>Americans for the Arts’ Monograph series featured in-depth issue papers on topics that were of the greatest interest to our members and arts professionals at the time. They often still serve as excellent resources for best practices and historic reference for today’s issues. Monographs were produced from 1993–2010. Monographs from 2001-2010 are available for downloadable in PDF format our online store at a nominal fee for nonmembers but free to members. All monographs from 1993-2000 are available for free download via the National Arts Administration and Policy Publications Database.<P>

To build a long-lasting relationship, culture and tourism must join hands in collaboration, implementation and communication.

Approved
P
NA
RS
Jenny Chowning
Report
Glickman, Louise
Americans for the Arts Monograph
Volume 1, Number 1
12
Tuesday, December 31, 1996
File Title: 
Cultural Tourism: Bridging America Through Partnerships in Arts, Tourism and Economic Development
Publisher Reference: 
Americans for the Arts
Old URL: 
http://www.artsusa.org/NAPD/modules/resourceManager/publicsearch.aspx?id=7995
Resource File ID: 
275
Research Abstract
Rank: 
6
Is this an Americans for the Arts Publications: 
Yes
Is CAC: 
No
Description: 
January 1997 Monograph
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
Global Tag: 
January 1997
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Increasing Cultural Participation: An Audience Development Planning Handbook for Presenters, Producers and Their Collaborators

This handbook suggests strategies for improving an organizations ability for increasing arts and cultural participation in their community. It includes a step-by-step guide through the planning, implementation, and evaluation processes of audience development. Case studies, helpful worksheets and a list of resources are also included. The handbook is designed for use by performing arts and literary presenters, producing organizations, collaborating organizations, and others involved in the audience-building process.

This handbook suggests strategies for improving an organizations ability for increasing arts and cultural participation in their community.

Approved
U
RS
RS
Jodi York
Book
Connolly, Paul and Hinand Cady, Marcelle
176 p.
Thursday, May 31, 2001
Publisher Reference: 
Unit for Contemporary Literature, Illinois State University
Old URL: 
http://www.artsusa.org/NAPD/modules/resourceManager/publicsearch.aspx?id=10589
Research Abstract
Rank: 
0
Is this an Americans for the Arts Publications: 
No
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
namp preview image: 

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