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Isamu Noguchi’s Voluntary Stay in a Japanese-American Incarceration Camp

The modernist sculptor voluntarily entered one of the many incarceration camps for Japanese Americans and it was an experience that deeply impacted him.
Friday, March 17, 2017

In 1941, Isamu Noguchi was living in Los Angeles, sculpting portrait busts for Hollywood stars while getting increasingly acquainted with the rich and famous. Then the attack on Pearl Harbor happened — and five months later, the Japanese-American artist was residing in the incarceration camp of Poston, Arizona, enduring unforgiving dry heat, afternoon dust storms, and bouts of despair. His entry, unlike that of the other prisoners, was voluntary: as a resident of New York, Noguchi was not subject to Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066 that forced those of Japanese background living on the West Coast to guarded camps further inland; but as an activist who felt he had responsibilities to fellow Nisei and Issei whose lives were torn asunder, he envisioned using his art to at least improve their living conditions.

Yes
NAMP Resource Categories: 
Source Name: 
Hyperallergic
Author Name: 
Claire Voon

How Airbnb Designs for Trust

Video

Joe Gebbia, the co-founder of Airbnb, bet his whole company on the belief that people can trust each other enough to stay in one another's homes. How did he overcome the stranger-danger bias? Through good design. Now, 123 million hosted nights (and counting) later, Gebbia sets out his dream for a culture of sharing in which design helps foster community and connection instead of isolation and separation.

NAMP Resource Categories: 
Preview Image: 

50 Best Tweets from the 2016 National Arts Marketing Project Conference

On November 11-14, over 600 arts marketers came together in Austin, Texas to explore the latest arts marketing strategies through the lens of this year's Conference theme, Fueling Change. Attendees shared new models, swapped ideas, and deepened connections. Topics explored the latest in digital marketing, social media, revenue generation, audience engagement, innovation, and more. 

We captured thousands of tweets at #NAMPC, so we've selected the Best 50 from the #NAMPC tweet deck for you to enjoy and share with others. 
 
E-Book
Juliet Ramirez
50 Best Tweets from the 2016 National Arts Marketing Project Conference
50
File Title: 
50 Best Tweets from the 2016 national Arts Marketing Project Conference
Research Abstract
Is this an Americans for the Arts Publications: 
Yes
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
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Announcing the Launch of the new National Arts Marketing Project Website!

Posted by Laura Kakolewski, Jan 25, 2017 0 comments

We listened to your needs and built a website that is simple to navigate, while providing the educational tools you need to market the arts in today’s competitive landscape.

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Banish Online Video Marketing Blunders for Good!

Video is fast becoming a vital online marketing tool, but with so much content already available, it’s a must that you stand out in a good way! Done right, online video marketing is a persuasive, cost-effective way to engage your audience and deliver substantive, visually striking messages. If you have yet to tackle online video marketing, it’s time to jump in! If your organization has already dabbled in creating and posting online video, there’s a good chance that your videos could make an even greater impact on your audiences.

In this e-Book, Banish Online Video Marketing Blunders for Good!, you’ll find examples of successful marketing videos from a variety of organizations and genres, including dance, theatre, music, and the visual arts.  We will caution you against key pitfalls, and you’ll learn:

  • how to create videos with high quality content and make production decisions that will ultimately gain the attention of your audience.
  • why not branding your videos successfully will ensure that your hard work will remain lost in the Internet abyss 
  • concrete tips on making your videos shareable, maximizing your exposure and building relationships.
  • the best practices for maintaining a successful YouTube channel. Why do all the work in creating awesome content if you don’t follow up with your audience’s reactions?

…and much, much more!

In this e-Book, Banish Online Video Marketing Blunders for Good!, you’ll find examples of successful marketing videos from a variety of organizations and genres, including dance, theatre, music, and the visual arts.

E-Book
Americans for the Arts
National Arts Marketing Project E-Book
16
Publisher Reference: 
Americans for the Arts (ArtsMarketing.org)
Research Abstract
Is this an Americans for the Arts Publications: 
Yes
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
2012
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Making Connections through Radical Hospitality

Posted by Ms. Lisa Mallette, Oct 06, 2016 0 comments

Engagement and marketing are not the same thing, but they can work very well hand in hand. As a marketing tool, engagement has everything to do with fostering a richer, fuller experience for those who are already in the building, and then, in turn, encouraging them to tell others about their experience.

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TAGGED WITH:

4 Ways to Build Stronger Customer Relationships Through Transparency

Consistency builds trust, deepens relationships, exposes customer challenges, and sparks innovation. Inconsistency results in confusion and distrust.

One way to be consistent is by communicating openly, honestly and with complete transparency.
Far too often, companies are only transparent when owning up to a negative action or righting a wrong so customers don’t run for the door. Time and again, this approach has proven to be ineffective. Customer retention is achieved only if a company has a history of putting the customer first, through both the good and the bad.
 

Yes
Source Name: 
Social Media Today
Author Name: 
Caitlin Zucalas

Monograph: Growing Interest, Shrinking Space: Arts Coverage in U.S. Newspapers

In 1998, the National Arts Journalism Program (NAJP) at Columbia University published Reporting the Arts, the first comprehensive analysis of arts coverage in mainstream American news media. The report studied trends in space, format, and coverage of arts and culture in daily newspapers from 10 communities and from selected national news outlets. Five years later, NAJP revisited the same 10 communities to observe what had changed in their cultural lives and local media coverage. Together, the publications yield a snapshot of how news organizations around the country are covering culture and, more importantly, how their approaches to arts coverage have evolved.

Americans for the Arts’ Monograph series featured in-depth issue papers on topics that were of the greatest interest to our members and arts professionals at the time. They often still serve as excellent resources for best practices and historic reference for today’s issues. Monographs were produced from 1993–2010. Monographs from 2001-2010 are available for downloadable in PDF format our online store at a nominal fee for nonmembers but free to members. All monographs from 1993-2000 are available for free download via the National Arts Administration and Policy Publications Database.

The National Journalism Program at Columbia University's Reporting the Arts studied trends in space, format, and coverage of the arts and culture in daily newspapers from 10 communities and from selected national news outlets.

Report
Szántó, András; Levy, Daniel S.; Tyndall, Andrew
Americans for the Arts Monograph
16
Publisher Reference: 
Americans for the Arts
Research Abstract
Is this an Americans for the Arts Publications: 
Yes
Description: 
Monograph: Growing Interest, Shrinking Space: Arts Coverage in U.S. Newspapers
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
Global Tag: 
April 2005
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For Immediate Release: Strategic Media for Local Arts Agencies

<P>When it comes to media coverage, many local arts agencies are so busy being reactive, there is often little time to be proactive. These days public outcry and funding crises often eclipse the stories that can arouse favorable public opinions about the arts in your community. Due to time constraints, we hope that by mailing releases and holding news conferences, we will rally public support on the issues. In fact, good, steady, consistent media coverage depends on more than just publicity. When done right, even agencies with only a handful of staff will see results. By learning to build relationships with local reporters, create strategies for press placement, fine tune your message and pitch arts stories to non-traditional newspaper sections such as business or heath, local arts organizations can not only heighten visibility for their agencies and the arts and bolster membership efforts, but also begin to shape public opinion through the media.</P>
<P>This Monographs can help you think about new ways to make media work for you. Following an overview of what makes news, this issue will explore how to disseminate that news and suggest new ways of thinking strategically about press coverage. Three examples of local arts agency media efforts give some insight on how agencies like yours are working to address a community's specific needs.</P>
<P>CONTENTS<BR>What's news? <BR>Compiling your press kit. <BR>Getting acquainted. <BR>Understanding media. <BR>Tools of the trade. <BR>The press release. <BR>The press conference. <BR>Editorials. <BR>Op-eds/letters to the editor. <BR>Radio and television. <BR>On and off the record. <BR>Picking spokespeople (and when media pick you!). <BR>Media relations: three examples. <BR>Creating a consistent message: a case study. <BR>Launching a public service campaign in the media. <BR>Arts on the air waves: working with radio. <BR>Other ideas. <BR>Conclusion. <BR>Resources.</P>

This Monographs can help you think about new ways to make media work for you. Following an overview of what makes news, this issue will explore how to disseminate that news and suggest new ways of thinking strategically about press coverage.

Approved
P
NA
RS
Jenny Chowning
As of October 1, 1997, the National Assembly of Local Arts Agencies is Americans for the Arts.
Periodical (article)
Neiman, Jennifer
National Assembly of Local Arts Agencies Monograph
Volume 5, Number 7
Monday, September 30, 1996
File Title: 
For Immediate Release: Strategic Media for Local Arts Agencies
Publisher Reference: 
Americans for the Arts
Old URL: 
http://www.artsusa.org/NAPD/modules/resourceManager/publicsearch.aspx?id=8297
Resource File ID: 
300
Research Abstract
Rank: 
5
Is this an Americans for the Arts Publications: 
Yes
Is CAC: 
No
Description: 
October 1996 Monograph
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Cable Access: Community Channels and Productions for Nonprofits

<P>Published by the Benton Foundation and the Center for Strategic Communications.</P>
<P>Cable television access represents an underutilized resource for video production and distribution in communities around the country, guaranteeing programming produced by, for, and about the community. This handbook has been designed to encourage nonprofit organizations to take advantage of the cable access facilities in their community. It presents a frame-work for understanding and using cable access, provides specific tips on getting involved in access, and offers 12 case studies of effective nonprofit uses of cable access for public education, community organizing, fundraising, and issue advocacy, including as case study of the Los Angeles Jazz Society in California. Includes a directory of the organizations mentioned in the study and other cable resource organizations.</P>
<P>CONTENTS<BR>Introduction. <BR><BR>Part 1. Why use cable access - Recognizing access opportunities.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; What is cable access?<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; TV viewing trends.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Who watches cable access? <BR><BR>Part 2. How to use cable access - Strategies for matching your needs with access&nbsp;<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;opportunities.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Getting involved in access.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Producing your own program.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Targeting and promoting.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Planning ahead for multiple uses.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Budgeting for access. <BR><BR>Part 3. Case studies:<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Wrightwood Improvement Association.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Milwaukee Audubon Society.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;Chaffee Planetarium.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Foxborough Council for Human Services.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Good Samaritan Hospital and Medical Center.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Los Angeles Jazz Society.<BR>&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; United Way of San Luis Obispo County/Neighbors Helping Neighbors, Inc.<BR>&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;American Association of Retired Persons, Area 7.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Northern Virginia Youth Services Coalition.<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Animal Rights Kinship.<BR>&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Little City Foundation.<BR>&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; League of Women Voters of Bucks County. <BR><BR>Appendix: <BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;Resource list. <BR>&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp; Notes [bibliography].</P>
<P>&nbsp;</P>
<P>&nbsp;</P>

This handbook has been designed to encourage nonprofit organizations to take advantage of the cable access facilities in their community. It presents a frame-work for understanding and using cable access, provides specific tips on getting involved in access, and offers 12 case studies of effective nonprofit uses of cable access for public education, community organizing, fundraising, and issue advocacy, including as case study of the Los Angeles Jazz Society in California. Includes a directory of the organizations mentioned in the study and other cable resource organizations.

Approved
P
NA
Report
Nicholson, Margie
59 p.
Sunday, December 31, 1989
Publisher Reference: 
Benton Foundation
Old URL: 
http://www.artsusa.org/NAPD/modules/resourceManager/publicsearch.aspx?id=5999
Research Abstract
Rank: 
0
Is this an Americans for the Arts Publications: 
No
namp preview image: 
NAMP Resource Categories: 

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