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103 ITEMS FOUND

The Many Hats of the 21st Century Arts Marketer: There is a Solution

Posted by Norah G. Johnson, Mar 28, 2017 0 comments

Realizations about trends in our field like multiple hat syndrome helped inspire a new program to support, strengthen and advance arts marketing and audience engagement skills in Pennsylvania.

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NAMP Ignite Talks: Digital Trends

Video
We live in a digital first, mobile first world. Now’s the time for arts and cultural marketers to meet audiences where they are.
 
In this NAMP Ignite Talk, President of Capacity Interactive, Inc. Erik Gensler joins David Wyatt, Co-founder & Business Director of Wyatt Brand in discussing why arts and cultural organizations should adopt video marketing as a part of their marketing strategy, and share tips for effectively leveraging it. 
 
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The 11 Generation Z Statistics Advertisers Must Know

The Top 11 Generation Z Statistics For Every CMO
Friday, March 17, 2017
Born in the time between the early 1990’s and the mid-2000s, Generation Z occupies a nebulous age bracket. Even so, the individuals that make up Generation Z have many characteristics that make them easily distinguishable from the preceding generations. Most significant, though, is Gen Z'ers affinity for the Internet. As “digital natives”, Generation Z presents a unique challenge and lucrative opportunity for digital marketers.
We’ve collected the major Generation Z statistics to give marketers a better picture of this developing consumer demographic.
 
Yes
Source Name: 
Mediakix
Author Name: 
Evan

Diversity + Inclusion = A Winning Strategy

Posted by Floyd Green III, Mar 09, 2017 0 comments

If we’re going to talk about diversity, we also have to talk about inclusion. Diversity acknowledges and celebrates the differences we all bring to the world. Inclusion is about picking up all of those differences and putting them to work together, and using them to drive designed and desired outcomes. Diversity and inclusion are critical at Aetna, particularly when we think about our consumers—they don’t all look and think the same way. Our employees must be diverse so that our strategies and services are diverse, leading to a practice of inclusion that allows our customers to receive the support that best suits them individually.

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2016 National Arts Marketing Project Conference - Opening Keynote with Adam Lerner

Video

Adam Lerner doesn't shy away from the ridiculous, and that's because the risk is not in failure or criticism, but in not taking the chance to begin with. In his keynote, Dying of Excellence, he explores courage: how do we, as arts leaders, find our courage to go outside the conventional? Through anecdotes and lessons, you will learn the secrets to keeping life, energy, and libido in your organizations—and, ultimately, how to not die of excellence.

NAMP Content Year (temp): 
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Announcing the Launch of the new National Arts Marketing Project Website!

Posted by Laura Kakolewski, Jan 25, 2017 0 comments

We listened to your needs and built a website that is simple to navigate, while providing the educational tools you need to market the arts in today’s competitive landscape.

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Marketing the Arts: Lessons from a Community Marketing Collaboration

The Charlotte MSO today is led by a senior marketing executive with a full-time staff of 10 plus one part-time employee and a commissioned sales representative. The mission of the MSO is to improve the overall quality of marketing, increase revenues and build audiences for each of the four participating organizations — Opera Carolina, Charlotte Repertory Theatre, North Carolina Dance Theatre (NCDT) and the North Carolina Blumenthal Performing Arts Center.

A specific objective of the Knight-supported project has been making market research and audience analysis an ongoing part of marketing campaigns. Another is improving marketing effectiveness through integrated mailing lists, improved graphic design and increased use of in-kind marketing support. A third is increasing the array of marketing services available to each organization. Whenever possible, the MSO attempts to leverage outside resources and reduce expenses from advertising media and other vendors by taking advantage of economies of scale.

The AMS research showed that the MSO has had a positive impact on earned revenue for the participating arts groups. Ticket revenues grew for three of the four groups, and the fourth company is now gaining subscribers after a period of decline. Other measures, such as audience awareness and percentage of seats sold, show more mixed results.

Implementing the MSO has not been an easy task for the participating groups. Making the transition from individual marketing programs to a cooperative approach has required effort, flexibility and a high level of trust in relationships that continue to evolve. In both concept and implementation, the MSO has required reinforcement along the way. But the very existence of the MSO, now well beyond the experimental phase, demonstrates the groups’ continued commitment.

The MSO has improved the quality of marketing for its member arts organizations and has fostered collaboration among the groups. The marketing team has created new sources of revenue, such as the outside clients and a successful Playbill publishing operation. The member groups continue to work together in ways they never had done before and almost certainly would not be doing today without the MSO. For the members, the benefits of the MSO collaboration continue to outweigh any real or perceived difficulties of the partnership. [Executive Summary p. 4]

"The Charlotte MSO today is led by a senior marketing executive with a full-time staff of 10 plus one part-time employee and a commissioned sales representative. The mission of the MSO is to improve the overall quality of marketing, increase revenues and build audiences for each of the four participating organizations — Opera Carolina, Charlotte Repertory Theatre, North Carolina Dance Theatre (NCDT) and the North Carolina Blumenthal Performing Arts Center." [Executive Summary p. 4]

Report
Shapiro, Phyllis, Editor
48
Publisher Reference: 
John S. and John L. Knight Foundation
Research Abstract
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
November 1999
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Increasing Cultural Participation: An Audience Development Planning Handbook for Presenters, Producers, and Their Collaborators

This handbook grew out of the experience of the Audiences for Literature Network (ALN), an audience development initiative supported by the Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Fund (now named the Wallace-Reader’s Digest Funds and referred to here as the Funds or the Wallace Funds). This program began in 1997 when eight community-based literary centers were chosen for one-year planning grants to develop projects through which they would form partnerships with other community organizations to build audiences for literature and literature programming.

The three-year implementation grants that resulted from the Funds’ ALN planning grants will culminate in 2001. Over the years, the eight organizations participating in the program have learned a great deal about audience building. In particular, they realized that they have much in common with colleagues across arts disciplines who are striving to increase cultural participation.

According to Michael Warr, ALN national coordinator:

These are extraordinary times in the literary arts. Audiences are flocking to readings, writing workshops, and poetry slams. Writers are performing with musicians, multimedia artists, dancers, and visual artists. The organizations in the ALN consortium have enhanced the strength and impact of their programs and have amassed a body of knowledge about audience building that they have shared with each other through conferences and electronic networking. This handbook is an opportunity to share that knowledge and experience with a broader range of groups working in diverse arts fields. The ALN groups and I are particularly excited about the expanded interactions taking place with performing arts presenters, many of whose experiences are also reflected in this publication.

The ALN was modeled after the Wallace Funds’ Audiences for the Performing Arts Network (APAN) and informed by the program design of other funds-supported initiatives such as the Arts Partners Program, administered by the Association of Performing Arts Presenters (APAP).

Kenneth C. Fischer is president of the University Musical Society, the multidisciplinary arts presenter at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor that was a participant in the APAN program. An enthusiastic supporter of partnerships among literary and performing arts groups, Ken writes:

When the ALN grantees joined me and nearly one hundred other Wallace Funds grant recipients in the performing arts fields at a gathering in Seattle in June of 1999, it became apparent to me that all of our organizations shared similar challenges and opportunities in audience building. I promoted the idea of ALN having a presence at the annual APAP members conference and have chaired two such meetings to date. These meetings, and the growing number of collaborations among local arts organizations, are expanding possibilities for partnerships among literary groups and performing arts groups to share knowledge and to embark on joint programs.

This handbook was supported by the Wallace Funds to share some of the discourse and process of the ALN groups with the broader field of arts organizations. It is the belief of the Funds that people-centered strategies for building public participation in high-quality arts programs can help institutions of varied disciplines and sizes to diversify, broaden, and deepen relationships with their communities. For that reason, this handbook addresses not only literary presenters, but also performing arts organizations. [Introduction p. 5]

This handbook grew out of the experience of the Audiences for Literature Network (ALN), an audience development initiative supported by the Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Fund (now named the Wallace-Reader’s Digest Funds and referred to here as the Funds or the Wallace Funds). This program began in 1997 when eight community-based literary centers were chosen for one-year planning grants to develop projects through which they would form partnerships with other community organizations to build audiences for literature and literature programming.

Report
Connolly, Paul and Hinand Cady, Marcelle
176
Publisher Reference: 
The Wallace Foundation
Research Abstract
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
2001
namp preview image: 
NAMP Resource Categories: 

Permission-Based Marketing: Using E-Mail to Engage African-American and Hispanic Audiences at the Chicago Theatre

The Chicago Association for the Performing Arts (CAPA) is the not-for-profit presenting organzation that manages the 3,600 seat Chicago Theatre at 175 N. State STreet in downtown Chicago. This case study shows how CAPA developed a large Database of email addresses of people who either attended events or expressed an interest in receiving information about upcoming events. Special emphasis is given to the African American and Hispanic patron for audience development. This case study is a complete analysis of the entire intitiative giving detailed information on the:

  1. initial situation analysis,
  2. internal factors,
  3. external factors,
  4. address collection tactics,
  5. tactics considered but not used,
  6. technical needs,
  7. e-mail processing and surveys,
  8. challenges faced and finally,
  9. Conclusions.

The Chicago Association for the Performing Arts (CAPA) is the not-for-profit presenting organzation that manages the 3,600 seat Chicago Theatre at 175 N. State STreet in downtown Chicago. This case study shows how CAPA developed a large Database of email addresses of people who either attended events or expressed an interest in receiving information about upcoming events. Special emphasis is given to the African American and Hispanic patron for audience development. This case study is a complete analysis of the entire intitiative.

Case Study
Hirsch, Jim
9
Publisher Reference: 
Americans for the Arts (ArtsMarketing.org)
Research Abstract
Is this an Americans for the Arts Publications: 
Yes
February 2003
namp preview image: 
NAMP Resource Categories: 

Future Investments-Two Examples of Developing Family Audiences for the Arts in San Diego

San Diego is the third fastest growing county in California, with a predicted growth rate of 6.1% between 1999-2004. Rapid population change means San Diego's arts community is faced with the imperative to attract new audiences. While the majority of arts organizations have traditionally been more successful at attracting audiences in the 45+ age group, many are now looking to develop family audiences, in order to increase and diversify their attendance by attracting both young adults and children. This case study provides examples of two San Diego based arts organizations: The Museum of Contemporary Art and San Diego Performing Arts League, who have taken the initiative to develop family audiences.

San Diego is the third fastest growing county in California, with a predicted growth rate of 6.1% between 1999-2004. Rapid population change means San Diego's arts community is faced with the imperative to attract new audiences. While the majority of arts organizations have traditionally been more successful at attracting audiences in the 45+ age group, many are now looking to develop family audiences, in order to increase and diversify their attendance by attracting both young adults and children. This case study provides examples of two San Diego based arts organizations: The Museum of Contemporary Art and San Diego Performing Arts League, who have taken the initiative to develop family audiences.

Case Study
Ball, Rebecca
11
Publisher Reference: 
Americans for the Arts (ArtsMarketing.org)
Research Abstract
Is this an Americans for the Arts Publications: 
Yes
Image Thumbnail of Pub Cover: 
2002
namp preview image: 
NAMP Resource Categories: 

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