The Arts and Economic Recovery Policy Recommendations Announced

Posted by Americans for the Arts, Jan 14, 2009 2 comments

Americans for the Arts today released its policy recommendations to President-elect Barack Obama and the U.S. Congress, as they begin consideration of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Plan. The nine recommendations detail how existing federal programs, as well as new proposals, can provide critical support to the country’s arts, as well as economic infrastructure. The policy recommendations are available here.

A comprehensive resource guide is also available for arts organizations. The website provides tools and research to assist groups in remaining fiscally healthy in this time of economic uncertainty. More information is available at www.AmericansForTheArts.org/information_services/recovery/default.asp.

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2 responses for The Arts and Economic Recovery Policy Recommendations Announced

Comments

January 15, 2009 at 10:23 am

I am very heartened by the clarity, breadth and focus of these recommendations. I would like to see civic engagement through the arts more present- that's the one addition i would make. But thank you for this good work.
Michael Rohd

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Mark H. Jones says
January 26, 2009 at 8:55 am

I work as the State Archivist at the Connecticut State Library in Hartford. I saw the article in the New York Times this morning (1/26/09). I am conducting a project to identify all of the WPA Federal Art Project (FAP) artists in Connecticut and their work. There were approximately 160 artists who worked for the FAP. This was the first and last time that the Federal government paid hundreds of artists as relief and for their talents for public art. It is good to see that others such as Americans for the Arts are drawing on that New Deal program to recommend a similar program for this depression.

Anyone who wants to know about our project can reach me at mjones@cslib.org or (860) 757-6511. I am willing to summarize the benefits of the FAP for people inthe 1930's.

mark

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